News : Amazon Kindle DX

News : Kindle DX Just as soon as

we finally get our hands on a new unit to test out, the boys over at Rapir Repair are racing to rip one apart. And that’s just what they’ve done here with the Amazon Kindle DX . Inside it’s got the requisite boards, wires, tape and cat hairs (just kidding), plus an E727NV WN2 wireless card, memory, CPU and Epson E-ink panel controller. It’s actually pretty sparse and clean inside of there — we’d expect nothing less! Hit the read link for the full, glorious disassembling (though there is one more shot after the break). Continue reading Amazon Kindle DX gets torn apart, examined Filed under: Displays Amazon Kindle DX gets torn apart, examined originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 11 Jun 2009 19:49:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds . Read PDF on 700 Now, what I want to do with the eReader is be able to view books (Stephen King, Dean Koontz) and view PDF’s I’ve bought, as well as reading work documents on the go. This would greatly reduce what I have to carry in a normal day. Needles to say, PDF support is a must. I also would like to be able to add notes to pages. I’m a notorious note take in my books, be it with post it’s or writing, this is very important to me. Now the Kindle doesn’t native support PDF’s and from what I heard their conversions aren’t the best. (Except for the Kindle DX, releasing on June 10). Every other eReader seems to support PDF. So I thought I would try to find the Sony Reader that supports PDF nicely and allows notes. The Kindle has always allowed notes and bookmarks, but has just now allowed PDF (Kindle DX). I was able to see and touch the Sony Reader 505 at Target, which is where I fell in love with the idea of an eReader, but could NOT find a 700 anywhere. Finally found that Borders has 700’s so I took a roadtrip to a local borders (about 1.25 hours away) to see the Reader. The 700 honestly did not impress me at all. The text was hard to read on a normal book, the contrast was horrid. The PDF support was nice, it had zoom and annotation that I wanted, but reading it was hard with the glare from the touch screen. I thought to myself, I should just try it. So I ask Borders what thier return policy is, they only return Readers if they are defective. The only Sony Store has a 14day return policy I believe, but after seeing the two side by side, I figure I won’t even bother. The Kindle DX, I believe, will be my reader of choice. The Amazon Store has an ample 30 day return policy (from delivery date) and PDF support. Plus it has a bigger screen. I found that while trying to read PDF’s on the Sony’s 6″ screen, it was hard to read at small “form”.. and when you expand the text the formatting kinda breaks. The large 9.7″ screen of the Kindle DX I think will really help with that.

Amazon’s New Kindle DX is an Electronic Game Changer

Amazon’s New Kindle DX is an Electronic Game Changer

What is a Kindle?

The Kindle is an electronic media reader built and sold exclusively by Amazon.  Some might call it a digital book but, as you’ll see, it’s so much more.

The thin that sets the Kindle apart from other digital readers is its revolutionary Digital Ink technology.  Unlike laptops, computers, or portable devices, the Kindle only uses electricity when the image on the screen is refreshed (when you “turn” the page for example).  The image is displayed in crisp grayscale (capable of up to 12 shades for exceptional clarity,) and “reads” more like regular paper text because there is no backlighting or glare from the screen.  This unique ability allows the Kindle to operate for an incredible two weeks on a single battery charge!

The Kindle isn’t just about reading books and looking geeky while you’re doing it.  The Kindle truly represents a big step toward that fabled “paperless society” everybody has been talking about since the first time they saw Captain Kirk and Spock talk to the ships computer on Star Trek the Original Series. 

In a very real way, the Kindle DX (Amazon’s biggest version yet) is similar to the Enterprise’s computer.  It’s a wireless device (operating off Sprint’s 3Gnetwork) that has access to Amazon’s massive library of over 275,000 books, 60,000 audio books, and hundreds of top rated periodicals (The New York Times and Time magazine.)  The Kindle DX allows you to digitally search, preview, and download anything from the Amazon library in seconds.  You can also easily transfer documents from one Kindle to another with Whispersync technology.  You can port your files over via a USB 2.0 cable as well but that seems just a little too old fashioned.    

Amazon targeted tech savvy business professionals as well with its upgrade.  The Kindle DX cantransport and view a wide array of digital media formats including:  Kindle (AZW,) PDF, text, Audible audio books, MP3, html, Word .Doc, Jpeg, and many more.  You want to listen to Stiff Whisker and the Driftwood Kids while you read the New York Times?  You Can.  Prefer to use the kindle as a business presentation tool and display your charts, graphs, documents, and photos with the portability of a device that weighs less than two pounds?  The Kindle is great for you as well.    

The new Kindle DX is a significant upgrade over the older, much smaller version, with:

  • 1) A 9.7″ display (capable of up to 16 shades of grey for crystal clarity)
  • 2) A built in dictionary (The New Oxford American Dictionary)
  • 3) Free access to the Wikipedia online encyclopedia
  • 4) A basic web browser great for text-centric sites such as Google
  • 5) Support for MP3 format to support audio (as mentioned above)
  • 6) An auto-rotating display that allows better presentation of oversized documents
  • 7) A Native PDF reader (which requires no conversion and preserves the original layout of the document)
  •  Amazon’s experimental Read-To-Me software (which converts text into spoken word)

Amazingly, Amazon stuffed all of that into a device that’s 1/3 of an inch thick and weighs just over a pound.

The digital Ink technology revolutionizes energy consumption in portable devices and the fact that Kindle can give anyone access to hundreds of thousands of documents without ever having to pulp a tree for paper is really quite amazing.  If paperless really isn’t your “thing,” just imagine how much space you’ll save by having your entire collection of dusty old hardcovers in a 1/3 of an inch digital box (not to mention the money you’ll save over bookstore prices.)

Colleges around the country have already pre-ordered the new Kindle DX, citing its ability to handle text book-sized material, its cost effectiveness, and its environmental footprint.  Yet the Kindle might not be as hot as Amazon wanted it to be be.  Why?  The price might scare most users away:  nearly $500!

When you consider what it can do and how many devices it can replace, even $500 is an incredible bargain.

Personally, I feel that if the Kindle fits within your budget, you should have one. 

 Amazon Kindle DX

Amazon Kindle DX: 9.7-inch screen and $489

 Amazon’s third incarnation of the Kindle is here, folks. All 9.7-inches of it. Specs and info leaked about the now official Kindle over the last week and they seemed pretty much dead on. It comes packing with the larger screen, auto-rotating screen, and finally supports PDF files fully with a native PDF reader. This larger Kindle also ups the storage capacity from 1,500 books on the Kindle 2 to 3,500 on the Kindle DX  thanks to 3.3GB of on board memory. The order is up now and will ship shortly if you’re willing to drop $489 on one.

More pics and info after the jump.

Slim: Just over 1/3 of an inch, as thin as most magazines

Lightweight: At 10.2 ounces, lighter than a typical paperback

Wireless: 3G wireless lets you download books right from your Kindle, anytime, anywhere; no monthly fees, service plans, or hunting for Wi-Fi hotspots

Books in Under 60 Seconds: Get books delivered in less than 60 seconds; no PC required

Improved Display: Reads like real paper; now boasts 16 shades of gray for clear text and even crisper images

Longer Battery Life: 25% longer battery life; read for days without recharging

More Storage: Take your library with you; holds over 1,500 books

Faster Page Turns: 20% faster page turns

Read-to-Me: With the new text-to-speech feature, Kindle can read every newspaper, magazine, blog, and book out loud to you, unless the book is disabled by the rights holder

Large Selection: Over 275,000 books plus U.S. and international newspapers, magazines, and blogs available

Low Book Prices: New York Times Best Sellers and New Releases $9.99, unless marked otherwise

Introducing Kindle DX–Amazon’s Large Screen Addition to the Kindle Family of Wireless Reading Devices
Large 
Kindle DX Display and New Features Provide Enhanced Experience for Reading a Wide Range of Professional and Personal Documents
SEATTLE–(BUSINESS WIRE)–May. 6, 2009– Amazon.com, Inc. (NASDAQ:AMZN) today introduced Amazon Kindle DX, the new purpose-built reading device that offers Kindle’s revolutionary wireless delivery and massive selection of content with a large 9.7-inch electronic paper display, built-in PDF reader, auto-rotate capability, and storage for up to 3,500 books. More than 275,000 books are now available in the Kindle Store, including 107 of 112 current New York Times Best Sellers. New York Times Bestsellers and New Releases are $9.99 unless marked otherwise. Top U.S. and international magazines and newspapers plus more than 1,500 blogs are also available. 
Kindle DX is available for pre-order starting today for $489 at http://amazon.com/kindleDX and will ship this summer.

“Personal and professional documents look so good on the big Kindle DX display that you’ll find yourself changing ink-toner cartridges less often,” said Jeff Bezos, Amazon.com Founder and CEO. “Cookbooks, computer books, and textbooks – anything highly formatted – also shine on the Kindle DX. Carry all your documents and your whole library in one slender package.”

New Large Display

Kindle DX’s display has 2.5 times the surface area of Kindle’s 6-inch display. The larger electronic paper display with 16 shades of gray has more area for graphic-rich content such as professional and personal documents, newspapers and magazines, and textbooks. Kindle reads like printed words on paper because the screen works using real ink and doesn’t use a backlight, eliminating the eyestrain and glare associated with other electronic displays.

The New York Times Company and Washington Post Company are launching pilots with Kindle DX this summer. The New York Times, The Boston Globe, and The Washington Post will offer the Kindle DX at a reduced price to readers who live in areas where home-delivery is not available and who sign up for a long-term subscription to the Kindle edition of the newspapers.

“At The New York Times Company we are always seeking new ways for our millions of readers to have full and continuing access to our high-quality news and information,” said Arthur Sulzberger, Jr., chairman, The New York Times Company and publisher, The New York Times. “The wireless delivery and new value-added features of the Kindle DX will provide our large, loyal audience, no matter where they live, with an exciting new way to interact with The New York Times and The Boston Globe. Additionally, by offering a subscription through the Kindle DX to readers who live outside of our delivery areas, we will extend our reach to our loyal readers who will be able to more readily enjoy their favorite newspapers. Meanwhile, we are continuing to work with Amazon to make The New York Times and The Boston Globe experiences on Kindle better than ever.”

Kindle DX’s large display offers an enhanced reading experience with another category of graphic-rich content—textbooks. With complex images, tables, charts, graphs, and equations, textbooks look best on a large display. Leading textbook publishers Cengage Learning, Pearson, and Wiley, together representing more than 60 percent of the U.S. higher education textbook market, will begin offering textbooks through the Kindle Store beginning this summer. Textbooks under the following brands will be available: Addison-Wesley, Allyn & Bacon, Benjamin Cummings, Longman & Prentice Hall (Pearson); Wadsworth, Brooks/Cole, Course Technology, Delmar, Heinle, Schirmer, South-Western (Cengage); and Wiley Higher Education.

Arizona State University, Case Western Reserve University, Princeton University, Reed College, and Darden School of Business at the University of Virginia will launch trial programs to make Kindle DX devices available to students this fall. The schools will distribute hundreds of Kindle DX devices to students spread across a broad range of academic disciplines. In addition to reading on a considerably larger screen, students will be able to take advantage of popular Kindle features such as the ability to take notes and highlight, search across their library, look up words in a built-in dictionary, and carry all of their books in a lightweight device.

“The Kindle DX holds enormous potential to influence the way students learn,” said Barbara R. Snyder, president of Case Western Reserve University. “We look forward to seeing how the device affects the participation of both students and faculty in the educational experience.”

New Built-In PDF Reader

Kindle DX  features a built-in PDF reader using Adobe Reader Mobile technology for reading professional and personal documents. Like other types of documents on Kindle, customers simply email their PDF format documents to their Kindle email address or move them over using a USB connection. With a larger display and built-in PDF reader, Kindle DX customers can read professional and personal documents with more complex layouts without scrolling, panning, or zooming, and without re-flowing, which destroys the original structure of the document. Everything from annual reports with graphs to flight manuals with maps to musical scores can be viewed on a single, crisp screen with Kindle DX.

New Auto-Rotation

Kindle DX’s display content auto-rotates so users can read in portrait or landscape mode, or flip the device to read with either hand. Simply turn Kindle DX and immediately see full-width landscape views of maps, graphs, tables, images, and Web pages.

New 3.3 GB Memory Holds Up To 3,500 Books

With 3.3 GB of available memory, Kindle DX can hold up to 3,500 books, compared with 1,500 with Kindle. And because Amazon automatically backs up a copy of every Kindle book purchased, customers can wirelessly re-download titles from their library at any time.

Incredibly Thin

Kindle DX is just over a third of an inch thin, which is thinner than most magazines.

3G Wireless, No PC, No Hunting for Wi-Fi Hot Spots

Just like KindleKindle DX customers automatically take advantage of Amazon Whispernet to wirelessly shop the Kindle Store, download or receive new content in less than 60 seconds, and read from their library—all without a PC, Wi-Fi hot spot, or syncing. Amazon still pays for the wireless connectivity on Kindle DX so books can be downloaded in less than 60 seconds—with no monthly fees, data plans, or service contracts.

Syncs With Kindle for iPhone and other Kindle Compatible Devices

Just like Kindle, Kindle DX uses Amazon Whispersync technology to automatically sync content across Kindle, Kindle DX, Kindle for iPhone, and other devices in the future. With Whispersync, customers can easily move from device to device and never lose their place in their reading.

Massive Selection of Books—Plus Newspapers, Magazines, and Blogs

The Kindle Store currently offers more than 275,000 books, including popular books like New York Times Bestsellers, New Releases, and fiction and nonfiction released in the past several years. Dozens of newspapers and magazines are also available for subscription or single-edition purchase. BusinessWeek and The New England Journal of Medicine are available in the Kindle Store starting today, and The Economist will be available soon. Subscriptions are auto-delivered wirelessly to Kindle overnight so that the latest edition is waiting for customers when they wake up. Over 1,500 blogs are available on Kindle and updated and downloaded wirelessly throughout the day.

Kindle DX includes all the other features Kindle customers enjoy every day, including:

Wirelessly send, receive, and read personal documents in a variety of formats such as Microsoft Word and PDF
Look up words instantly using the built-in 250,000 word New Oxford American Dictionary
Choose from six text sizes
Add bookmarks, notes, and highlights
Text-to-speech technology that converts words on a page to spoken word
Search Web, Wikipedia.org, Kindle Store, and your library of purchased content
No setup required—Kindle comes ready to use—no software to load or set up
Amazon Kindle is sold through Amazon Digital Services, Inc.

 

By Matt Burns